Fundraising

 This year, Barkerville Historic Town & Park is pleased to announce the commencement of its plan to construct of six (6) full-service cottages at the gates of Barkerville. These new cottages will provide clean, comfortable and convenient accommodation options throughout the entire year at Barkerville and each will feature three bedrooms, one and half bathrooms, a full kitchen and dining room with a wheelchair accessible main floor. Construction of the first cottage (the Lottie Bowron Cottage) has begun, and is scheduled for completion in fall of 2017. 

For more information about the Barkerville Cottages project, including opportunities for donations, corporate sponsorship and recognition, please contact Ed Coleman, Barkerville’s Chief Executive Officer, at 1-888-994-3332, ext. 23.

 

About Lottie Bowron

Lottie Bowron was born in Barkerville in 1879, the eldest of five children of John and Emily Bowron. John was one of the famous Overlanders of 1862 who became Barkerville’s Gold Commissioner and Postmaster. Emily was one of Barkerville’s first school teachers. Like her parents before her, Lottie had a remarkable career, starting her schooling in Barkerville and later studying in Yale, BC and Tacoma Washington. She began her career in BC’s provincial government and eventually served as secretary to BC Premier Richard McBride, beginning in 1909 and later moving to London to assist him in his role as BC’s agent general during WWI. In 1917, she returned to BC to work at the Empress Hotel. During this time, Lottie became the founding president of the Kumtuks Club for Victoria’s Businesswomen and the president of the Conservative Women’s Association.

When the Conservatives Government returned to power in the BC legislature in 1928, Lottie earned a new title as Rural Teachers’ Welfare Officer, a rare senior position for a woman in government. At the time, there were 700 female school teachers in BC, mostly young, unmarried, earning meager pay, and socially isolated. Lottie was now responsible for them, and at the age of 50, she travelled to some of the most remote and difficult to access parts of the province to meet these women and make recommendations to the government for their health and welfare. 

In her youth, Lottie was known for her independent spirit. Lottie never married. In her elder years, she was better known for sympathetic eye. Most importantly to us, Lottie was proud of her Barkerville upbringing, and spent time in Barkerville every summer during her retirement. She was instrumental in the movement to have Barkerville recognized as a Provincial heritage site in 1958, and provided many personal accounts and memories to assist with the restoration of the town, even donating her personal photographs. Lottie was a key expert on St Saviour’s Church and was on hand to open the restored Theatre Royal in 1964 before she passed away the following winter at the age of 84.

It is for this remarkable story that we are proud to name the first of the Barkerville Cottages after Ms. Lottie Bowron.

Barkerville Historic Town & Park gratefully acknowledges support for the Barkerville Cottages project by Northern Development Initiatives Trust, through the Economic Diversification Infrastructure Fund and the Province of British Columbia’s Heritage Branch. We also thank our corporate sponsor, West Fraser Mills, for their generous support of the project.

For more information about the Barkerville Cottages project, including opportunities for donations, corporate sponsorship and recognition, please contact Ed Coleman, Barkerville’s Chief Executive Officer, at 1-888-994-3332, ext. 23.